Thursday, September 10, 2009

Herstoryan's Hearth: Apple Pie (1833)



Excerpt from:

Dods, Mistress Margaret (Christina Jane Johnstone). THE COOK AND HOUSEWIFE'S MANUAL: A Practical System of Modern Domestic Cookery and Family Management (Fifth edition). London: Edinburgh, Oliver & Boyd / Simpkin Marshall & Co, 1833. pp 433-434

"Fruit-Pies require a light and rich crust. Fruits that have been preserved are generally  baked in an open crust, and are ornamented with paste-bars, basket-work, stars, etc. Preserved fruits need not be put in till the crust is baked, as the oven often injuries their colour. - See Flans. 
804. Apple-Pie. - Wipe, pare, and slice the apples; core with the instruments. Lay a strip of puff-paste round the edge of the dish. Put in a layer of the sliced fruit, then sugar and whatever seasonings you use. A small mixture of quince greatly improves the flavour. Proceed in this manner till the dish is heaped, keeping the fruit highest in the middle. Cover it with puff-paste, ornament the border and the top with leaves, flowers, etc. -Obs. A variety of apples besides codlins are used for baking, though russetings, Ribstone pippins, golden pippins, and such as melt equally, and are a little acid, are esteemed the best. Apple-pie used to be seasoned with pounded cinnamon and cloves; now lemon-grate, quince, marmalade, candied citron, or orange-peel, are preferred. If the apples have become dry and insipid, the parings and cores may be boiled with a stick of cinnamon and sugar, and the strained liquor added to the pie. Apple-pie is often liked hot. It is eaten with plain cream, made cream, or Creme Patissiere, No. 711. It was wont to be buttered; and this is still the practice in some provincial situations in England, though buttered pease, and buttered apple-pie, for reasons which we do not comprehend, have latterly come to be considered ungenteel, if not absolutely vulgar. Buttering is performed by putting a piece of fresh butter into the hot pie when it is cut open. Apples must be thrown into plenty of water as they are pared, or they will become discoloured."



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